Massachusetts Lawyer for Employment Defense
Massachusetts Employment Defense Lawyer » Posts for tag 'workplace'

Employers Must Take Care During Employee Firings and Disciplinary Events

The recent shooting with multiple fatalities at a beer distributorship in Connecticut serves as a grim reminder to employers and human resource professionals everywhere that one should always be aware of the potential of danger when administering disciplinary measures to employees. There are very simple and practical rules for employers and human resources professionals to undertake when imposing disciplinary actions which should increase safety and minimize risk.

1) Never meet alone with an employee. Always have a witness.

2) Position the meeting so that the employee is farthest away from an exit and you and your witness are closest to that exit. That way, if the employee becomes violent or threatens violence, you have a moment or two to make your escape.

3) Carry your cell phone with you and be prepared to contact the police if you are threatened or if violence erupts.

4) Treat the employee with dignity and respect. Do not belittle or demean the employee, regardless of the reason for the disciplinary measure. Be firm, but respectful. In most instances, employees will not agree with you about the reason for the discipline. That’s ok. You can explain that that they have the right to disagree with you, but that the decision is final.

5) In the event that you are terminating the employee, if practical, do so in a private setting to allow the employee some privacy (but see Rule 1). Terminations are always emotional and difficult for everyone involved. It’s understandable that the employee may get upset and emotional. A private setting will afford them an opportunity to deal with their emotions without the prospect of public humiliation. Of course, if the employee become angry or threatening, end the discussion and leave.

6) Inform the employee that he or she may not return to the premises for any reason without your express permission and notify receptionists and other personnel that the employee is no longer with the company. If, after that notice is provided to both the departing employee and to necessary personnel, the employee does return to the premises, do not hesitate to call 911 and report that an unauthorized ex-employee has returned to the workplace. It is better to be cautious than injured.

These guidelines provide no guarantee of safety of course. No one can predict human behavior. However, they do provide a reminder that one has to be practical and consider the safety of everyone when disciplining employees.

For further information regarding methods of handling workplace discipline, please contact me directly at dmurphy@rubinrudman.com or at (617) 330-7123

Massachusetts Enacts New Anti-Abuse and Anti-Harassment Laws; Massachusetts Workplaces will be Affected

Massachusetts has enacted new anti-harassment and anti-abuse laws which will affect on the workplace. The law, which becomes effective on May 10, 2010, creates a procedure for anyone to obtain a protective order for harassment if they are the victims of three acts of intimidation, abuse, or property damage, or are they are the victims of a forceful or threatening act which causes another to involuntarily engage in sexual relations or other related crimes. The law uses definitions of “abuse” and “harassment” which are so broad that there will be significant workplace implications.

These procedures allow courts to issue Harassment Prevention Orders (”HPO’s”) against anyone who engages in these types of behaviors.  Unlike the more restrictive state and federal anti-harassment laws which prohibit harassment based upon protected class status, HPO’s are not subject to administrative filing prerequisites, nor are they limited to claims based upon protected class status. HPO’s can be filed in superior court, the Boston Municipal court, or the respective divisions of any juvenile or district court in which the plaintiff resides.  And, they may be filed on an emergency basis without any notice to the defendant (ex parte).

The statute defines “abuse” as “attempting to cause or causing physical harm to another or placing another in fear of imminent serious physical harm.”  Under the HPO, if a person engages in “3 or more acts of willful and malicious conduct with the intent to cause fear, intimidation, abuse or property damage toward a specific person, and does, in fact, cause fear, intimidation, abuse or property damage to that person, the victim may obtain injunctive relief from the court, prohibiting the harasser from any contact with the victim.  As a practical matter, this means that an employee who engages in this type of behavior at work can be prevented from returning to work until and unless the issue is resolved to a court’s satisfaction. 

We are all aware of workplace situations in which co-workers, bosses, and even clients and customers, engage in inappropriate and unprofessional conduct at work.  They yell, they scream, and they throw things around when things don’t go their way.  So called “workplace bullies” are not the norm, but they do exist and create significant morale and productivity issues at work.  Now, with the implementation of this new law, the possibility exists that these unrestrained individuals face far more significant consequences than disciplinary actions from their employer.  While HPO’s are civil in nature, they are enforced criminally if violated.

What Should a Massachusetts Employer Do?

As a result of the new Massachusetts law, employers should undertake measures to reduce the likelihood of abuse or harassment within the workplace. Prevention of abusive behaviors and harassment should be the first goal. If reported, an immediate and appropriate response is critical. I suggest that every employer provide training, guidelines, and effective reporting procedures. 

For further information regarding the implications of this new law in the workplace, please contact me directly at dmurphy@rubinrudman.com or at (617) 330-7123.

Top of page / Subscribe to new Entries (RSS) / Terms of Use